Beire

There’s no doubt that Biere/Beer comes into its own in the summer, but we’re no longer just talking about a light, thirst-quenching drink. With Spain as Europe’s 4th biggest producer after Germany, UK and Poland, there is a sweep of malts and ales demanding to be taken seriously. Beer is the world’s oldest and most widely consumed alcoholic drink; it is the third most popular drink overall, after water and tea. The production of beer is called brewing, which involves the fermentation of sugars, mainly derived from cereal grain starches – most commonly from malted barley, although wheat, maize (corn), and rice are widely used. Most beire is flavoured with hops, which add bitterness and act as a natural preservative, though other flavourings such as herbs or fruit may occasionally be included. The fermentation process causes a natural carbonation effect, although this is often removed during processing, and replaced with forced carbonation. Some of humanity’s earliest known writings refer to the production and distribution of beer: the Code of Hammurabi. There’s no doubt that beer comes into its own in the summer, but we’re no longer just talking about a light, thirst-quenching drink. With Spain as Europe’s 4th biggest producer after Germany, UK and Poland, there is a sweep of malts and ales demanding to be taken seriously.